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14 August 2007

Comments

mwanji
1.

Wow, that photo is horrible.

David Adler
2.

I know Martin and I like his writing, but I'm not so sure about the Coltrane hook either. And I think the vogue for Coltrane produced some phenomenal music by Liebman, Joe Farrell and plenty of others.

Also, I am sure this was not Martin's intention, but I cringe, cringe, cringe when I see a photo of four white saxophonists who are praised for saving jazz from the influence of a black legend. I'd be surprised if Frahm, McHenry, Goold and Byars see themselves that way at all. (I'm a fan of all of them, by the way.)

I'll be doing a profile soon for the Philly Inquirer on Odean Pope, one of our less-discussed Coltrane heirs. Big mistake to consign players like Pope to the dustbin.

DJA
3.

Also, I am sure this was not Martin's intention, but I cringe, cringe, cringe when I see a photo of four white saxophonists who are praised for saving jazz from the influence of a black legend.

Especially since the most notable apostate from the Church of Coltrane in the past twenty years is Mark Turner.

On the other hand... I honestly don't think that putting a bit of distance between yourself and Coltrane is a bad thing for a younger tenor player to do. That vein is pretty well tapped at this point, and I think there's a big difference between the guys who followed closely in Trane's wake (Lieb, Farrelll, Pope, and of course Brecker) but brought their own mojo to it, and the third-, fourth-, fifth-generation copies.

One thing that actually does distinguish Joel from the morass of musclehead post-Trane harmonic hurdlers is his devotion to Sonny. (It would have been nice if Johnson spent some time talking about exactly how these players deal with Coltrane's legacy and his dominating influence on tenor players.) It's weird to me that Sonny is so beloved and yet not obviously influential -- the qualities that make his playing great are only rarely heard in modern-day tenor players.

David Adler
4.

All true, thanks. I'd have to say Frahm is my favorite tenor player right now. And the most devastating quote-smith around, very true to Sonny in his particular way.

mwanji
5.

"It's weird to me that Sonny is so beloved and yet not obviously influential -- the qualities that make his playing great are only rarely heard in modern-day tenor players."

That may have to do with why Coltrane is an icon far beyond jazz and Rollins isn't. I'm not quite sure why that is the case.

DJA
6.

I'm not quite sure why that is the case.

I'm pretty sure the spiritualism (especially A Love Supreme) and subsequent mythologizing has a lot to do with that. Also, he was the very picture of the relentlessly "serious" artist. Sonny's more of a wild card, and uses irony and irreverence a lot more explicitly, which (for reasons I don't really understand) makes him less attractive as a representation of people's idea of a Great Artist. And of course, Coltrane's recorded output is a lot more consistent, his classic quartet had unbelievably good chemistry, and he died relatively young.

That said, André 3000 is doing his part to create a mystique around Sonny...

DJA
7.

You know, inspired by the Sonny thread, I just reached for The Freedom Suite and put it on. And then I learn that Max Roach has died. Dammit.

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